Malaria

Malaria is a life-threatening disease. It’s typically transmitted through the bite of an infected Anopheles mosquito. Infected mosquitoes carry the Plasmodium parasite. When this mosquito bites you, the parasite is released into your bloodstream.

There’s no vaccine available to prevent malaria. Talk to your doctor if you’re traveling to an area where malaria is common or if you live in such an area. You may be prescribed medications to prevent the disease. These medications are the same as those used to treat the disease and should be taken before, during, and after your trip.

Causes Of Malaria

Malaria is caused by protozoa of the genus Plasmodium and is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. The history of malaria shows that it was difficult to determine the disease's mode of transmission. When some cultures reviewed the facts available to them, they concluded that malaria was caused by bad air without realizing that the same swamps that created foul-smelling air also were excellent breeding grounds for mosquitoes. In 1880, the parasite was identified in an infected patient's blood.

Symptoms Of Malaria

Malaria can occur if a mosquito infected with the Plasmodium parasite bites you. There are four kinds of malaria parasites that can infect humans: Plasmodium vivax, P. ovale, P. malariae, and P. falciparum. P. falciparum causes a more severe form of the disease and those who contract this form of malaria have a higher risk of death. An infected mother can also pass the disease to her baby at birth. This is known as congenital malaria. Malaria is transmitted by blood, so it can also be transmitted through: